Mini-Master’s of Library Science

Colorful Mini-Master's of Library Science at the Gretna Public Library for children who want to learn more about their library.Many months ago I was chatting with the wonderful Miss Meg from Miss Meg’s Storytime. If you don’t know her blog, then please stop reading and follow the above link. These words will wait for you over here, and you’ll be in for real storytime awesomeness treats over on her blog.

Okay, so Meg and I were chatting on Facebook where I was bemoaning the discovery of a sign that one of my team members had made. I give that teammate HUGE kudos for taking the initiative in trying to fix a perceived problem. However, the sign sent out an unwelcoming vibe – and it featured this symbol:

And when I spoke with that team member – she totally got it and we took down the sign.

But here’s the issue that led to that sign’s creation:
kids wandering back behind our circulation desk.

I’m actually incredibly grateful that the sign had been made and posted because it was the jolt that I needed to really think about this situation. I mean, what was the problem with kids being behind the desk with us? Yes, rules are important, but why wouldn’t we foster kids’ curiosity and ownership of their library?

So, that’s what Meg and I chatted about – and what happened as a result was nothing short of magic. Together we came up with the Mini-Master’s in Library Science!

We were incredibly excited about the thought of this and how it could be used. I mean, what if we welcomed kids behind the desk and share with them the joy that we have with our jobs? Both kids and parents would learn more about librarianship and the importance of education within it. But most important, both the children and the librarians would be making incredibly special memories. Squeeeee!!!

Meg ran with it right away and created her certificate. A storytime fan of hers had asked if she could have her 9th birthday party at the library with Meg (I mean, how awesome is that in and of itself?!). Well, Meg presented the attendees with certificates and frames to put them in! The local newspaper covered it:

Newspaper coverage of the first mini-master's of library science. Miss Meg bestowed these certificates during a birthday party at the library after the attendees took a tour and learned about library science.
^^^SO AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!^^^

I hope that Meg will write about the experience on her blog sometime, because there were some very special moments during that event. Like, at least one got me ultra misty eyed. I’ll be sure to add a link here if and when she does.

For me, it took me months and months to finally get ours going, but going we got it! I asked our library page put take the template that Meg shared with me (and she’d share with you, too, if you ask her) and adjust it for your library.  And guess what?! I’ll share our template with you, too!

Gretna Public Library in Nebraska's Mini-Master's of Library Science degree that children can be awarded after a library tour and recommending a book to one of the librarians.
It’s a Microsoft Publisher file – so you’ll need to reach out and email me at and I’ll send that file to you. If you don’t have Publisher, then still ask! I can take the certificate and try to convert it to whatever program that you have.

The debut of our Mini-Master’s program happened just a few weeks ago:

Rebecca McCorkindale shares the special moment of C.J. and Mitchell being the first to earn their Mini-Master's of Library Science. A.k.a. BABY LIBRARIANS!!! Such an awesome library memory for everyone involved.
C.J., on the far left, had told me a week before that he wanted to be a librarian when he grew up. ::melts:: So I asked his dad if I could take his boys on a library tour the following week. It happened and it was just as amazing as I’d hoped. I looked forward to it all week, and those boys just ate up all the “behind the scenes” stuff. And after they presented me with books that they’d recommend (a Frankenstein board book and a Thomas book), I presented them with their degrees!

I shared the above photo that their dad took for me on our library’s Facebook page (after getting the dad’s permission) and it was an enormous hit!
::intones a la Oprah:: ADVOCACYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!

Even better? One of the local papers was there covering another story (our therapy dog storytime) and took some shots and published it the following week:

The Gretna Breeze's photos of the Mini-Master's experience at our library.
And now the boys have permission to come around the desk and check out their own books as long as we’re not too busy. They took advantage of that the other day – and though it was a wee bit chaotic (getting the younger brother Mitchell to take turns is a lesson in and of itself), I could tell that it meant the world to C.J. He would practically burst with pride whenever he perfectly scanned a bar code on the first try.

I hope that you take a look at possibly incorporating a Mini-Master’s degree into your library’s programming. It’s a joyous experience for everyone involved. And I even asked a girl yesterday if she’d like to have a special library tour on her next visit (we were closing in a few minutes and couldn’t fit one in at the time) – and the glowing grin she had while nodding? Pure. Magic.

I can hardly wait!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

First Library Card Celebration

Over the past few months, my overall vision for our library has become about making good memories for everyone at our library. I have been working on a two-parter post to delve into this new managerial perspective, but I just had to share a new tradition that we started at our library.

Because IT. IS. AWESOME!!!!!!


One of the neatest experiences at our library is when a child finally turns six years old, and thus becomes old enough to get a library card. There are times that kids have come in still wearing their party hats and have proudly stated that they are now six and would like to get their first card.

But what if we could make this experience even better? To really signify to the kids that this is an awesome thing happening (and hopefully an experience they will cherish for the rest of their lives).

How about make a special pledge for the kids to recite? Eh, too serious.

Have a monthly library party for kids who got their first card? Nah – too much work that would not equate directly to the moment the first card is given.

I also didn’t want it to be something to take away from the focus of what’s special: getting a library card for the first time.

To make a long story short: I believe the idea came to me while watching MLP: Friendship Is Magic. Pinkie Pie had hidden confetti cannons around Twilight’s castle. What about those little confetti poppers?  I loved those as a kid!  But they’d be WAY too loud (and slightly dangerous) in our small space. But what if there was a quieter/cheaper confetti shooter out there? Pinterest to the rescue!

After handing this project over to Natasia, she ran with it and made some really beautiful cannons. Feel free to ask in the comments (or via email: if you’d like details on what she did and I’ll happily share.

Here’s our first confetti cannon trial:

I wish that the video could show how amazing the confetti is – it goes up high and shimmers beautifully as it flutters down. It also doesn’t take a whole lot of confetti to be effective (about a teaspoon I’d guess).

And here’s our very first kid to get this special treatment:

I’ve lost count of how many kids we’ve given this special treatment to, but lemme tell ya what: this has been even better than I had hoped. A mothers shared with us that her (under six) daughter gathered up some of the confetti that we shot when her older brother got his first card. Now the little girl keeps it in her pocket because it’s special. Everyone who happens to be in the library at the time end up smiling and cheering with us for our newest patron. It’s simply joyful.

When I shared this in Storytime Underground’s Facebook group, the main comments were about the mess.

Now lemme tell you what’s what: I hate a messy/disorganized work space. I’ve banned glitter except for in rare cases. But to have the library look like a fun party went down? I can live with that. For a bit. And a suggestion from a Director at a nearby library turned out to be perfect: get a manual floor sweeper. I think her words were, “it’s a confetti beast.”  We purchased one of these and have been very happy with that purchase.

The confetti has been very impressive in terms of how far it can go. But you know what? I think that most people who see it will not think “messy,” but “I wonder what happened here? It looks like they had fun!” We also hand sweep-up confetti on our circ desk to reuse to cut down on waste.

And there you have it: one of the funnest passive things we’ve ever done. Do you do anything special for first library cards (regardless of age)? I’d love to know about it!

Shop Grand Reopening

I’m pleased to finally announce that I’m opening up my shop again! And for the first time it’s my artwork and not just ornaments! Going this route is a great way to keep a shop going while still trying to figure out how to manage my fibromyalgia while having a side business.

I have completely reworked my superhero mashups into higher resolutions so that they can be made into a wide variety of clothing, decor, and accessories.

I also created two new mashups in honor of the occasion:

It’s Spider-Gwen (aka Spider-Woman) and Squirrel Girl!

As of now these two are only available at Redbubble, but they will eventually be added to Society6. Each online store has a slightly different inventory, so it’s worth checking both out if you’re looking for a certain thing (such as dresses or clocks).

Oh – and I definitely should mention that I still want anyone who wants to download, use, and/or modify my images to do so! Seriously, you don’t need to ask (unless the print shop wants a waiver or a letter stating that I’m cool with you using my art – just shoot me a request at

So hop on over to my Shop section, and click on either ad to go to my profile on either site. And today (7/25/16) Redbubble’s having a 20% off sale! But know that both sites do have sales on a pretty regular basis – woohoo!

And finally an update on the original Hafuboti shop’s recycled book ornaments: I still have a nice selection of them! But getting them transferred from Etsy has been more of a chore than I’ve felt like dealing with over this past year or so. Therefore, I don’t have them listed anywhere online, but I do hope to eventually change that.

In the meantime, if you are an ornament fan, then please don’t hesitate to reach out and ask about any ornaments you may remember. is still the best way to contact me and I’m always thrilled to get mail from any of my readers. Seriously – it always brightens my day.

Happy shopping!

Our Summer Reading Program

For Bryce’s Summer Reading Hype Videos I ended up doing two videos. I did this mainly because I had two ideas that I loved, and I could’t decide between them. The first idea was my TRIP Tips video, but the second was much more ambitious. It took learning some new ukulele, animation, and sound mixing skills. Enjoy!
 CLICK HERE if you’d like to have the lyrics and ukulele chords for this song. And yes, it’s a major earworm courtesy of Ringo Starr’s Octopus’ Garden. Have I mentioned that I’m a Beatles fan? Cuz I totally am.

Be sure to watch all of the videos that other librarian bloggers have created for this project. Bryce has been sharing these videos on her blog by updating this post every week. They are all awesome!

LEGO MAY-nia 4: Resurgence

The prep for this year’s front window display began a full month prior, where we put out mysterious colorful squares containing two black lines. We instructed our youngest patrons to write their name on the top line, and then a book or book series’ name on the second line. We then kept the squares. That’s all that the public knew except that we were going to use them in the front windows in May.

What they didn’t know was that we’d add “can’t LEGO of” in between the lines, and then glue on circles to the other side to give it a false 3D look. THEN we built a picture using those 2D bricks.

Children's Library's front exterior windows in May 2016. Pretty landscape spring scene made out of flat paper LEGO bricks.

Closeup of a 2D LEGO paper flower in our front library windowsInterior library closeup of the 2D LEGO bricks' backs. Kids wrote their names and a favorite book or series, and we added "can't LEGO of."


The only thing we thought we’d do differently in the future is pay attention to on which side the peg’s shadow would fall. If you look closely, then you’ll spot some shadows in directions that don’t make sense. It was a subtle thing, but as Melissa said in a recent Mel’s Desk post, “Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good.”

We also took the books/series that our young patrons wrote on the flat bricks as a pull list for our reading bench display:

"Books You Can't LEGO of" library book display.

Both very random and very cool.

Our Children’s Librarian Jennifer held a special Family LEGO Fun Night, and after this successful event, she put several of the creations in our new plexi display cubes:

Three of our plexiglass displays filled with creations from our library's LEGO Family Fun Night.

We reused our LEGO mini-figs as our scavenger hunt.

Our library's LEGO MAY-nia scavenger hunt.

And, of course, we had another Mini LEGO Checkout Club. I made a video once it was complete.

This remains the most popular annual passive program. I can’t think of any program that we have where kids ask about it throughout the year.

And there you have it: the re-re-re-return of one of our most popular themes!

Artsy April Redux

This year the schools’ art teachers graciously bowed out of the Artsy April community art show at the library. And so, my team set out to redefine Artsy April. And, like Decemberley, we decided to shift our focus to book illustrators.

Natasia had the strongest idea and drive to focus on Dr. Seuss – specifically The Lorax since we had Earth Day that month, and our state is the home to Arbor Day (and a tree is the focus on our city’s logo). So, credit for this month goes solely to Natasia – she utterly rocked it:

It’s amazing what construction paper, a black marker, and tape can become in special hands.

Side note about construction paper: for some reason, the makeup of construction paper causes it to lose its color in the sun. Natasia remade several of the truffula tree tops midway through the month due to major fading.

Here’s a closeup of the star of our show:

The Lorax was a HUGE hit with kids (shocking, I know).

One day a little boy was completely smitten with our Lorax. Our awesome Children’s Librarian remembered his name, and on the day we took down the display, we contacted his mom to see if she would like to have our Lorax. Her response was an unsurprising OMG YES!!!! And I was thrilled to be the one who got to surprise that little boy with his very own Lorax. He literally hugtackled it – and I’m amazed that it didn’t rip.

For our reading bench display, Natasia created a fun word scramble (the words changed once-a-week):

And we filled the display with environmental, gardening, and tree-focused books.

This was the fullest our display ever was. We kept having to find more and more to fill it with since the items were flying off the display – yay!

Oh yes, and wouldyoulookatthoseTruffulaTrees?!?! Here’s a closer pic:

Cardboard tube, construction paper, a paper mache ball (that Natasia made), a black marker, and feather boas! So. Cute.

Finally, Natasia made these adorable Thing 1 and Thing 2 for our super-ultra simple scavenger hunt.

I swear that kids treated those characters like rock stars – even if they didn’t realize the Thing they found was part of a scavenger hunt. These special things now live on one of our office walls.

And there you have it: our revamped Artsy April! 

Get Your Readathon On

Back in April, my Director sent me an email along with a link to #Readathon2016. In her email, she suggested that we take part in this national fundraiser for Every Child Ready to Read. I wish that I could say that I was super-enthusiastic for this event at the get-go, but honestly, I saw it as one more thing to add to the pre-summer reading stress pile. I chatted with my Director about it for awhile, and what can I say? Her enthusiasm was catching.

So, I started thinking about what made races fun for me. Before fibromyalgia came into my life, I had been a runner who was hoping to transition from running 10K’s to half marathons. I wasn’t a huge fan of running, but I always loved the races. And the mementos I always enjoyed having were my race bibs and participation medals. I mean, I even framed my first racing bib.

Yes, that’s me pre-fibro.

And that became my goal: get medals and make race bibs. Make this event feel like a reading race (without the competition factor).

We purchased 100 reading medals and neck ribbons. They were the cheapest good-quality medals we could find. Yes, they’re expensive, but we believe in upping the quality of what we give out to our community so that it’s likely to be kept as a memento and not thrown out after a day or two. Plus, in case #Readathon2016 was a flop, this year’s CSLP theme is about sports/games and we knew that we could find ways of distributing any leftover medals.

The smartest thing we did was put a medal around the event flyer holder. Kids and parents would see the awesome medal and ask how they could get one. It was one of the best advertising tools we’d ever had (so far).

I then designed our own race bibs. I started in the 100’s just so the numbers would fill the bib and look good. Here’s how they looked:

Finally, the only other prep work we did was created a “race form” where we took down names, bib numbers, start times, and then end times.

The day of the event came, and the first nine people through our doors the moment we opened, were there for the Readathon!

We stared off by pinning on the bibs, ran out of safety pins, then used string to make them like necklaces

And my most hopeful wish for the event came true: there were families all over our library – both inside and outside – reading together. I was crying tears of joy on the inside.

My favorite picture from the event.

And then Jennifer, our Children’s Librarian, started singing Chariots of Fire as she hung the medals around completers’ necks. And I joined in after I realized what she was doing (because I’m a total ham): And everyone who signed up completed the “race!” Our Children’s Library is currently only opened for 2 hours on Saturdays, and we wanted to make the reading time achievable for any age – so we set a goal of reading for 30 minutes on-site. Most read for longer than that, and we were thrilled with how seriously the kids took it. One boy had his mom get out her phone and use its timer app.

The thing that never occurred to me, and that made my heart grow three sizes that day, is that there were so many happy conversations as people were leaving. Two little girls were thrilled to have won their VERY FIRST MEDAL EVER. A little girl told her babysitter that she couldn’t wait to show off her medal to her both parents and grandparents. It was those overheard conversations and the pride on kids’ faces when they were presented with their medals that made this such an amazing event.

Yeah, I suspect that we didn’t do a great deal of money-raising for Every Child Ready to Read, but we created a great deal of awareness for the program. Plus we made some really great memories for both participants and our library team. And that’s what I consider a huge win for us!

Summer Reading Party

Back in April a group of amazing librarians and I received an unexpected invitation from Bryce of Bryce Don’t Play. She was wanting to know if we’d be willing to put together short videos for her team members out in the Washington County Collaborative Library System (WCCLS for short – be sure to check out their fabulous series featuring P.A.C. Cat – I’m totally inspired to do something similar when we upgrade our catalog system this fall). The goal was to make our videos hype videos to help inspire them throughout the summer season.

Lemme see…create a fun video for librarians? I could maaaaaaaybe possibly do that. Heh.

I had ideas for several videos, and Bryce graciously let me make more than one. But today I’m sharing the first since Bryce is sharing one video per week. I’ve been lucky enough to have seen most of the other participants’ videos – and I am utterly thrilled to be a part of such an inspiring and talented group of librarians – y’all are gonna be in for some real treats.

Okay, with out further ado, here’s my Summer T.R.I.P. Tips video:

I know what you’re thinking: gosh, Rebecca made that look so easy – she’s a video rock star! (heh) To help dispel your sweet but very misguided belief, I put together a blooper reel from just a few of the many takes it took me to take this video to the next level.


To answer your main question that I suspect you have: I had never met those little boys before I asked their mom (whom I also didn’t know) if we could videotape me tripping them. I am so glad that the first family I asked readily agreed! I don’t think my blood pressure could’ve handled asking more moms or dads.

I also created a Radioactive Man library mashup image (seen very briefly in the video) that I wanted to share here:

And there you have it! The first in a virtual summer librarian par-tay!

Summer Library LEGO Trailer

As of late I have been experimenting with animation. I’m not the greatest at it…yet, but it’s passable.

Here’s a short Summer Library LEGO Club faux movie trailer that I made for our library:
Fun Fact: The music you hear is me on my ukulele – I just pitched it lower during the editing process. It saved me lots of time and stress trying to find a free fair use Jaws-like theme for this project.

With very little effort I edited this video for any library to use to promote their LEGO Clubs during the summer:
Feel free to download, modify, customize, or whateverize this for yourself or your library.

Have fun!


So You Think You Can Present

2016 became the year that I jumped head first into presenting in the library world.

2016 also became the year that I got a major ego check in the library world.

And yes, those two things are related.

When I was asked by the Three Rivers Library System to speak about Summer Reading Programs, I freaked out a bit, but I had faith in my skills. How hard could presenting be for me? After all, I have a theatrical background, I don’t get very nervous in front of crowds, and I have lots to share. So I agreed.

This poster for the event was the best thing about the event. Truth.

The “presentation” happened, and I was not happy with it.  However, I chalked it up to a combo of fibro flaring which led to lack-o-focused preparation. Needless to say, I was grateful that the attendees hadn’t paid for the experience of watching me ramble my little head off.

Cut to about a month later.

As part of being this year’s Chair of the School, Children, and Young People’s section of the Nebraska Library Association, the Chair of the Public Library and Trustee section Pat Leach worked with me to create a mini-conference event. Pat had helped me feel welcomed at my first NLA Board Meeting (where I had been shaking in my shoes), and I was excited to work with her. So, when she asked if I knew of someone who would present in one or two breakout sessions, I volunteered. I was excited to visit different regions of Nebraska, try out a different presentation/redeem myself, and just get to know more Nebraska librarians.

This post won’t take into consideration the Guerrilla Storytimes because they aren’t presentations per se.  I mainly moderated the time and read question prompts – attendees created the content.

It was completely unintentional, but what this experience afforded me was basically a presentation boot camp. After all, I got to watch the keynote speaker give the same presentation three days in a row. I watched how she worked the crowd, kept things moving, and handled technical hiccups.

Looking back, I can confidently say that the librarians who attended my first Welcome presentation would not recognize the presentation as being the same one I gave two days later.

Let’s break these vastly-different-yet-the-same presentations down, shall we?

Now, I know that I am one to sometimes, er, be over-dramatic in my retelling of things, but in this case? It is 100% plain truth that it was terrible. I don’t know that I’ve ever been so shaken to my core about anything performance-wise before. So, please learn from me and do not make my mistakes.

This time around I had written out a much more in-depth outline of the presentation to help keep me on track. I had even created a basic “menu” for people to take notes on. However, I never actually went through some practice runs of my presentation. If I had, then I would have realized some important things. Mainly, that my laptop was suddenly struggling with playing videos. It would freeze up my whole system. Yeeeeeaaaaaahhhhh…

So there I am, with four audience members in this nice conference room, and I am blathering on even worse than I did in my Summer of All Fears program. And that’s when it happens – nope, not the laptop (not yet) – two of the four people start talking during my presentation. And these are two ladies who work at the same library – so it wasn’t like friends who hadn’t seen each other in months. I had never imagined in a million years that any library worker would be so rude. And attendee #3 was texting on her phone the whole time. Attendee #4 was the only one who seemed to care that there were words coming out of my mouth.

I really debated whether or not to share that information since it would be pretty dang easy for those two librarians to recognize themselves (assuming that they’ll ever read this). But, you know what? I hope that they feel some level of shame for their behavior because it was so incredibly rude. It absolutely crushed me, and I didn’t have the tools to know what to do about it.

And yes, the grand finale of my presentation was a video. And yes, my laptop froze. And finally one of the talking ladies seemed to take notice as I’m basically reenacting the video’s highlights and offered to let me use her laptop. So I played the video and kept a brave face on as I wrapped things up, though all I wanted to do was go into a bathroom and cry.

Being the analytical person I am, I had spent the rest of the day trying to break down how things broke down. I decided to put the video first since it really clearly describes what I’d be talking about. I also decided to ask Pat about what to do in case of audience rudeness. Pat’s sage advice for what to do with this apparently common problem was to 1. ask a question of one of the ladies to try and break up their chatting, and if that doesn’t work, 2. ask them to take their conversation elsewhere.

It was then that I also realized that I could be taking notes on how the keynote speaker handled her presentation. So, on day two I focused my energy on that.

To say that I was terrified of presenting the very next day would be an understatement. I was trying to fake it until I made it, and that never really happened. I had lost my confidence, but I was determined to make it better than the day before. It also helped that I was with Pat, because if I’d been travelling on my own, I likely would have been wallowing in despair.

Anywho, here’s the breakdown of my experience:

I really liked having the video play first. It ensured that there wasn’t anything wrong with that library’s projector system (because if there was, then there’d be time to ask someone for help). I had also added more examples from my library.

Things were going okay despite my lack of confidence, but then I noticed it: there were people SLEEPING in the audience. It was after lunch and because I had shown the video first, I had dimmed the lights. I really should have brought the lights back up after it played.

But you know what? I discovered my first “audience angel” in the crowd. This librarian was in the front row, and she was giving out such positive and supportive vibes that I wanted to stop everything and give her a hug (which I practically did after I was done). She made me reflect on how I am as an audience member, and I think that from now on I will try and be an angel in the audience for speakers. I mean, I’ve always thought of myself as a good audience member, but I never thought about giving back to the presenter in as simple of a way as smiling at her as she spoke. Darn tootin’ I’m doing that from now on.

Overall, the biggest takeaways from this presentation was that I needed to figure out how not to ramble (because whereas the earlier portions of the presentation were better, the ending sort of derailed and I was left rambling). I needed to find a kick-booty ending statement and leave it there, even if I had more ideas on the topic.

I also realized that I needed a Powerpoint presentation, and I needed one bad. Fortunately, it was the final leg of our journey, and I’d be home that night. So I stayed up late and created a presentation that would allow people to look at it and not stare me down for the entire length of my presentation. And ohmygosh a slideshow was exactly what I needed to focus my topics.

The intimidating thing about this final presentation was that it was basically in my backyard: I knew at least half the people attending, and others I knew by reputation. Eep! But I really upped my “fake it ’til you make it” attitude, and went into a reverse-denial mode. None of these people knew what had happened on the previous days, and they deserved to get the best that I had to give.

Was it perfect? Nope. The biggest issue was that there was a problem with the Powerpoint presentation. The fonts were all whackadoo, and I didn’t realize that I wouldn’t be able to see the notes I had made under each slide. A friend told me later that the way to avoid the Powerpoint issue was to save the presentation as a pdf – that way everything’s locked and loaded.

And I could figure out the notes issue on my own (whispers: put them on notecards).

The night before I had a fabulous realization (if I do say so myself): I could throw Mardi Gras beads into the crowd at the end – which I did. It was a BLAST for everyone, and bonus? They wore their shnazzy necklaces afterwards, making people who went to the other presentation jealous (heh).

And you know what? I actually got applause at the end.


I was actually stunned – I’ve never received applause like that at any of my presentations. And let me tell you what: I loved it in an incredibly relieved way.

Now here’s the funny/sad thing that I realized while looking back at these three presentations: if I had given Presentation #3 on day 1? I would have thought it a failure. So, even though I went through the hecky-pooh, I ultimately achieved my goal after the first presentation: to make each following presentation better. And by golly, I’m proud of Presentation #3 – goofs and all!

And you know what? A day later an amazing online librarian friend asked if I’d work on a presentation with her for another state’s annual conference. I said “HECK YEAH! BRING IT!”

UPDATE: Our presentation at the Nevada Library Association’s Conference was AMAZING!!!!! We spoke to a standing-room-only crowd and it went smooth as butter. I highly recommend partnering up on presentations because you have one another to lean on when presenting. So have hope! You can do this!

So there you have it: a tale of the same presentation given three days in a row.

How about y’all? Any tips for us presentation noobs? Any tales of terror and/or speaking redemption you’d like to share? Please do!