Build a Better Artwork pt. 3

Grouping of four diverse modified public library symbols | hafuboti.com

I recently realized that I could easily modify my alternative summer programming artwork (here and here) to give a wider variety and make them overall more useful in library land. The way I’d do that would be to take each image and replace what the character was holding with a globe.

I must give a HUGE shout-out to both Angie and  Bryce for brainstorming ideas to represent PWD. These images would not be as diverse if I had not had their help.

There is a subtle difference in these images from their original counterparts: I moved the figures so that all would line up along the bottom line of their arms. The thought was that if you line them up, then they’d have a nice flow and their diverseness would be even more obvious.

Feel free to click on and download any or all of these and use them throughout your library, as profile pictures, buttons, etc.

Modified public library logo featuring a yellow background and an elderly person holds the world instead of a book | hafuboti.com

Modified public library logo featuring a burnt orange background featuring a First Nation man holding the Earth | hafuboti.com

Alternate library logo featuring an African-American girl holding a globe on a purple background | hafuboti.com

A different take on the universal public library logo featuring a person holding the planet on a golden background | hafuboti.com

An awesome African-American woman holds the world on this alternative public library logo | hafuboti.com

An edgy person with a cochlear implant holds the world in a special version of the universal public library image | hafuboti.com

A person in a reclining wheelchair looks at an assistive device that displays the planet Earth | hafuboti.com

Homage to the public library logo featuring a woman wearing a hijab while gazing at the planet | hafuboti.com

Library logo featuring an African-American male with a hearing aid and an epic fade holding the planet vs. a book | hafuboti.com

A female with a tracheotomy holds the world in this modified universal public library symbol | hafuboti.com

As always, if you feel that I have misrepresented or made any unintentional errors in any of my artwork, then please let me know.

Also please consider sending me a thank you donation for sharing this artwork. These look simple, but as anyone who does minimalist work knows, it’s deceptively difficult. For example: the female engineer took about 16 hours to complete. Seriously. So thank you for your thank you if you choose to thank me!

7 thoughts on “Build a Better Artwork pt. 3

  1. These are amazing! Do you have any of these images as coloring pages or do you have suggestions on how one would make them into coloring pages?

    • Thank you so much, Emily!
      As of now I do not have any of these as coloring pages. I’ll give it a go in Photoshop to see if I can make it work since I don’t think there’s a way without that tool to make them into coloring sheets. Until then, I do have a basic logo that can be used as a coloring sheet (which kids can riff on their own version to bring more diversity to libraries). It’s this post: https://hafuboti.com/2017/01/28/library-logo-line-art/
      Cheers!

      • I just had another thought on how you can make a coloring sheet pretty easily. Having a lightbox works best, but you can also use a window on a sunnyish day.

        Basically tape up a printout of whatever image that you want to make into a coloring sheet and then tape up a blank paper on top of it. Then trace the outlines using a sharpie (or a light blue crayon if you’re wanting to make it super-sharp – you’ll take down the papers and *then* Sharpie over the blue crayon or even colored pencil – the blue lines won’t show up when you photocopy it). Ta-da!

  2. Pingback: Build a Better World Artwork | Youth Services Desk

  3. Pingback: Libraries Resist: A Round-Up of Tolerance, Social Justice, & Resistance in US Libraries

  4. Hello! We have printed your beautiful artwork and have it hanging up at our public library in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Thank you for your inspiring images!

    • Hi, Nicole!

      Thank you so much for taking the time to let me know how and where you’re using my art – that totally made my day!

      Keep up the good work of making your library welcoming to all!

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