Book End Cozy Redux

This is the third, and final, sign revamp post. Here is part one and part two in case you missed them.

As I went to look for my post on what I call “book end cozies,” I realized that my first post about them was buried in a holiday-book post. Oops.

And at the beginning of my most recent book end cozy quest (heh), I thought that I had come up with an amazing new way to use laminating machines, which prompted me to post this:

Well, it turned out to not work. Even the first prototype turned out to be a fail after I looked at it closer. But hey! Hopefully, through my research, I can save you from experiencing upsetting things like laminator-jams:

Needless to say, I finally came up with a fool-proof template for professional-looking bookend cozies that I am excited to share with you! Yay!

Okay, so exactly are book end cozies? Well, they’re signs that go over bookends to indicate exactly what books are contained between those book ends. Like this:

SMALL BOOK END COZIES
(5.5″W X 4.75″W)

First up, I measured out and designed what I wanted our cozies to look like, and then printed them out onto cardstock to give them a better chance at a long life. Note that both sizes of cozies are on Letter-sized paper (8.5″ X 11″).

Then, I used our slide-cutter to cut the signs out. If you don’t know what slide-cutter is (also known as a paper trimmer), then you need to get yourself one. I have been using a Fiskars paper trimmer for both work and my ornaments, and it’s fan-friggin-tastic. Here’s what it looks like:

It has a thin wire that goes along where the blade will cut – so you can see exactly where your cut will be made. It doesn’t handle stacks of papers, but it’s totally fine with two pieces of stacked cardstock. This slicer is perfect for detailed work.

Once I had two of these signs cut out, I folded each in half and then made a sharp crease using a bone-folder (they’re not just for book covering). You can make folded things, such as brochures, look so professional by using a bone folder.

I took it a step further (let’s hear it for type-A’s!!!) and added some black crayon scribble on the sign, and along the white edges of the cut cardstock:

This was to give it a bit more depth, as well as hide any miss-folds and/or the white edges.

Now it’s laminatin’ time.

Two smaller cozies can go in one laminator sheet, you just have to be a bit careful.

Once they’re out – it’s trimmin’ time!

I sliced the laminate edges down to 3/16″ around the sides and top, :

And then on the bottom, I sliced a tiny bit off of the paper:

I did this so that they’d become a pocket, like so:

Okay, that may not have been the best visual example, but at this point, the cozy is done. All you have to do is slip is over a small book end:

Doesn’t it just pop compared to the cozy that it’s replacing? And it totally matches our new signs. Plus, the original was looking rough, but note that it was never laminated. Here’s a shot from the back:

It even looks good on this side! And there’s an added bonus that we shouldn’t need to use packing tape to keep it on. If, after it gets regular use and it turns out that tape is needed, then I’ll update this post.

LARGE BOOK END COZIES
(9″H X 6″W)

The large cozies end up needing two pieces of Letter-sized paper, but one laminate sheet.

So here we start out:

I had to re-shoot the above image, so yes, it’s a different sign, but same size as what’s below. And I had a “blank” black scribbles page printed out, too. I did some added scribbling and white-edge covering here as well:

Not pictured: sandwiching the two sheets back-to-back and then laminating them in one laminated sheet, and then cutting down the extra laminate (down to a 3/16″ edge) , and trimming off the bottom.

In the following picture you can see the new cozies and one of the cozies that they’re replacing. The original is completely sun-faded (it used to be black and a light orange). I’m hoping that using a printed-out design will lessen or altogether eliminate the fading.

And best part? You can use these cozies with different styles of book ends to bring about a cohesive look. These are what the above book ends look like without their cozies:

And here’s what a book end cozy looks like in use:

Whispers “Sooo Preeeeettyyyyyy…”

Now for some technical stuff that should get you book end cozying to the max!

If you have Photoshop, then email me (hafuboti@gmail.com) and I will send you the layered files for the small and large cozies.

Don’t have Photoshop, but have Word? Have Photoshop, but don’t wanna email me for files? Then here are the measurements for cozy text boxes:

Small Cozy: 4.92″ H x 5.25″ W

Large Cozy: 9.5″ H x 6.62″ W

Have Word and don’t know what I’m talking about? You can tell Word the exact size that you’d like to have your text box. With your text box selected, go into the Format/Drawing Tools tab and look to the right:

Ta-da!

And hey, if you need more help with this, then just reach out to me. I will breakdown any aspect of this process if you’re uncertain about any part of it.

Masked Social Media Images

Crystal, a librarian in Montana, reached out to see if I would make a Facebook Cover of the My Masks Protect My Community design. Of course I could totally do that, and I did, and now I’m sharing several versions of it for y’all to use. Yay!

Libraries Are For Everyone: Fulani

This Fulani #LAFE translation comes from Robyn Stout, a Teacher Librarian in Indiana.

Thank you so much, Robyn!!!

A NOTE: My entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage
everyone to download, share, modify, and use my work.

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and the message. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you say that it’s by “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously.

I plan on putting this note on the bottom of all of my Libraries Are For Everyone posts so if you’ve read the above paragraph once, then you won’t need to again (unless you really want to).

 

Libraries Are For Everyone: Macedonian

MSc. Jelena Petrovaska, library advisor at NI University Library “St. Kliment Ohridski” in Bitola, North Macedonia provided me with the Macedonian translation of #LAFE.

Thank you, Jelena, for sharing your beautiful language!

A NOTE: My entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage
everyone to download, share, modify, and use my work.

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and the message. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you say that it’s by “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously.

I plan on putting this note on the bottom of all of my Libraries Are For Everyone posts so if you’ve read the above paragraph once, then you won’t need to again (unless you really want to).

Libraries Are For Everyone: Tajik

This translation comes from Stephanie Yancey, the Library Media Specialist at Myrtle Beach High School in South Carolina. In her email to me she said that “We were named the most diverse school in the state a few years ago, and I’m constantly struggling to find materials for my diverse group of students.  We have one of the largest Uzbek and Tajik communities on the east coast, and it’s super difficult to find youth materials for these students. ”

I’m so glad that with her help, we can have #LAFE signs for her students.

Thank you so much both Stephanie and the student who translated #LAFE for us!!!

A NOTE: My entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage
everyone to download, share, modify, and use my work.

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and the message. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you say that it’s by “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously.

I plan on putting this note on the bottom of all of my Libraries Are For Everyone posts so if you’ve read the above paragraph once, then you won’t need to again (unless you really want to).