Libraries Are For Everyone: Kannada

Suzanne Fox, a wonderful librarian in Seattle, reached out to me to see if I could create LAFE signs in Kannada. She had a student who provided me with the text:

Handwritten "Libraries Are For Everyone" in Kannada | hafuboti.com

How cool is that?!

A HUGE thank you goes to both Suzanne and her fantastic student for making it possible to include Kannada signs!!!

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring ten diverse patrons holding globes on a yellow background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on a rose background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on an orange background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on a yellow background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on a green background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on a blue background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kannada featuring three diverse patrons on a purple background | hafuboti.com #LAFE #LibrariesR4very1

A NOTE: I am slowly working on getting my artwork uploaded onto the Wikimedia Commons for people to find it easier all the while making all of it “officially” licensed. That said – my entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage everyone to download, share, modify, and have fun with my work!

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and elegance. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you crediting it to “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously. Have fun.

Libraries Are For Everyone: Bookmarks

Earlier today I received a nice comment and a question from the magnificent Mary in Indiana. She wanted to know if I had a LAFE bookmark templates available. And I was like, OHMYGOSHIDOANDINEVERTHOUGHTOFSHARINGIT!
phew!

I had made a set of English ones for Library Week at my library, but realized that I could and should kick the designs up a few notches by including various languages.

Right click on either one of the two sets of bookmarks below to save a jpeg that you can use on a letter-sized piece of card stock. OR click on each set for a pdf. I’ve also included a jpeg of a single blank bookmark that you can use to make more bookmarks in any language that you’d like. We put our library’s name on the back side, but you could also add the language and what it means – something like that.

Have fun spreading the library love! And thanks, Mary, for helping me to realize that I had something that would save librarians time and/or lower their stress!

LAFE Bookmark Set Redux

 

^^^ From top to bottom the languages are Spanish, Arabic, Simplified Chinese, Klingon, and French. The side bookmark is English.

LAFE Bookmark Set 2 Redux

 

^^^From top to bottom the languages are Amharic, Filipino, Hebrew, Tamil, and Icelandic. The side bookmark is Norwegian.

LAFE bookmark blank template

 

^^^That’s the blank template – it doesn’t look like it so I’m adding this text to help point it out.

Libraries Are For Everyone: Kiksht/Wasq’u

Colleen from Clackamas Community College in Oregon City, OR reached out to me with a Kiksht/Wasq’u translation.  One of the women who helped with the translation shared this with Colleen:

This language has no longer any elder fluent speakers surviving, but we have recording & hard copies on hand.

Thank you for inviting our language!

I am so glad that members of the tribe was able to figure out a translation that comes closest to expressing the sentiment despite the sad reason it was extra challenging.

Thank you to both Colleen and the tribal members who made this translation possible!!!

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring ten diverse library patrons on a yellow background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on a rose background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on an orange background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on a yellow background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on a green background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on a blue background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

Libraries Are For Everyone sign in Kiksht/Wasq’u featuring three diverse library patrons on a purple background | hafuboti.com #LibrariesR4Every1 #LAFE

A NOTE: I am slowly working on getting my artwork uploaded onto the Wikimedia Commons for people to find it easier all the while making all of it “officially” licensed. That said – my entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage everyone to download, share, modify, and have fun with my work!

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and elegance. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you crediting it to “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously. Have fun.

KNOWvember

Jennifer, our kick-booty Children’s Librarian, had a great request for some of our monthly themes: throw more non-fiction into the mix. And we have! And it’s been more fun than I thought it’d be! And yes! I am exclaiming a lot! But that’s mainly because of our first super-focused on non-fic theme: Celebrating "KNOWvember" in November can be a lot of factual fun! | hafuboti.com

As a child, I totally recall thinking about how both no and know sounded exactly alike. Hooray for homonyms! It was probably the first time I enjoyed linguistics and stuff like that there. So seeing this theme made my inner child pretty happy for the entire month.

Natasia did a beautiful job on decorating our front windows:

"Knowvember!" A theme for the Children's Library where the focus was on non-fiction and facts! | hafuboti.com

Each section of the window had its own theme: history, science, math, and the arts.

She also turned our whiteboard in the activity area into a jumble of facts:

A whiteboard with "Did You Know?!" at the top, and then a mix of facts printed out and taped up for kids and families to read and learn. | hafuboti.com

Natasia also made a cool non-fiction book display with the word KNOW spelled out as a sign. Sorry that I failed to take a photo of that. I also failed to get a photo of Ashlynn’s nerdy scavenger hunt. I really need to make a monthly list of photos that I need to take before we switch out themes. You’ll have to trust me that those things were pretty cool.

But I hope I was able to share enough to inspire you to create your own non-fiction and factual displays!

SeptZENber

It turns out that I got some of my themes/months confused. I had thought that our Pokemon Go decor had been in September. Nope. It was a bonus August theme (thank you to my team for pointing this out to me – and I’ve gone back and corrected my earlier posts as a result). Basically for September’s theme we wanted something relaxing and peaceful; thus SeptZENber was born.

Natasia made a stunning tissue paper mandala in our front windows:

The front windows and door at our Children's Library featuring a lovely tissue paper and Mod Podge mandala in celebration of SeptZENber | hafuboti.com

I would find myself gazing at it when I needed a mental break from the tasks at hand. It looked especially beautiful in the morning sunlight since our building faces east. We also received a larger-than-normal amount of compliments and questions on the application technique from our patrons.

Natasia further continued the loveliness with our reading bench display:

Beautiful "Relaxing Reads" library display with a simplified flowery mandala | hafuboti.com

HUGER THAN NORMAL thank you goes to Natasia for this picture. I absolutely failed at getting good pics of all of her hard work which I hope to have corrected for future posts. It’s worth noting that this display was quite popular with parents who were in the midst of back-to-school stresslandia.

If you look closely at the above pic, you’ll notice a smallish peace sign with something on it on one of the window frames – that was part of our monthly scavenger hunt. It was one where the kids had to find the different colored peace signs and put it on their worksheet. Then they had to unscramble the letters to spell out a simple word like peace or love – depending on the week (or their age – we didn’t make preschoolers do the word scramble).

We also had special classes with Two Keys Creative Studio on stone mandalas and stone painting. Thank you to the instructor Sarah Fettin-Kuester for providing this pretty cool picture from one of our classes:

Image of library class attendees showing off their painted stone mandalas. Photo courtesy of Two Keys Creative Studio | hafuboti.com

It was during this class that Sarah discussed cultural appropriation and what a fine line it can be while giving a lesson about mandalas and what they meant in Hinduism and Buddhism. As a result, I had an “OMG I NEVER THOUGHT OF THIS THAT WAY ” revelation. And because of this realization, I do not plan to repeat this exact theme, class, or use mandala coloring sheets for any of our passive coloring programs. I’d much rather err on the side of respect.

We also had a local yoga instructor come in and host classes for both young ones and their families. They were a big hit, and I only had to handle one complaint that “yoga is demonic and anyone who does it invites demons in to possess them.” True story. I believe that the patron and I had a good discussion about this since I try and do yoga to help with my chronic pain, and not once have I been possessed. In the end she was grateful that I took the time to listen and thoughtfully respond. Again – erring on the side of respect.

And that was really the biggest lesson I learned during SeptZenber:

Wouldn’t the world be a nicer place if we all erred on the side of respect?