What’s In a Name?

It’s been years (!) since I wrote about Punk Rock Book Jockeys, and I still love that title and the movement that it began. The only down side to it is that it really hasn’t done anything to change the public’s understanding of what a librarian is or should be. To the majority of people, it’s still “if you work in a library, then you’re a librarian.”

For decades, our profession has been working hard to educate the public about librarianship, and from what I’ve seen, it hasn’t been effective. Furthermore, it has left out the thoughts and feelings of the thousands of library workers who work alone in their small community’s libraries. They are, and will forever be, librarians to everyone in their towns.

One of the most persistent arguments that I’ve heard throughout the years from librarians goes something like this: “You wouldn’t go to a hospital to have a nurse perform a complicated surgery on you – and that’s how it should be in libraries. You wouldn’t want a paraprofessional handling information for you.” I bring this up in order to return to it in just a bit, since this argument helped me get to the entire point of this post.

I think that it’s safe to say that most of us know that there should be a change. But what I’m trying to say is that we could be going about it in a much more compelling way. It’s hard to make people change something ingrained in them by arguing that a large segment of workers they have known, and who have touched their lives, are unqualified.

So, here’s my proposal: change the name of what a librarian with a master’s degree is called. After all, to go back to the hospital analogy, there have always been different terms for hospital employees (doctors, nurses, etc.) – those workers have never been called “hospitalarians.” The medical field has differentiated the job titles since hospitals came into existence – so the analogy doesn’t quite hold, but it sure got me to thinking.

And while working on a presentation about paraprofessionals and librarians working together, I had a lightning bolt realization of what I thought we should consider calling librarians with MILSes. Are you ready? Here it is:

Master Librarians.

Boom. It says what it is, and is what it says. It would be a conversation-starter with anyone who hears it. Libraries everywhere have librarians, but not all libraries have Master Librarians. I think that many people would be incredibly proud to be called a Master Librarian after putting in all the blood, sweat, tears, and money (oh so much money) that it takes to earn a master’s degree.

Really take a moment to consider what could happen.

What if, in a sweeping motion, the American Library Association declared that “all who work in libraries are librarians.” To those outside of our profession, it may seem like they’re stating the obvious, but to us insiders? It would be epic. I believe that the ALA would seem more welcoming and worth the investment to all the library workers who were made to feel less-than.

And if the ALA took it a step further and gave a new name to librarians with master’s degrees? That would both honor and elevate those who have dedicated a great deal of their lives to our profession. Plus, people might begin to truly grasp the importance of librarianship. I know that my community would be incredibly proud that their library has two Master Librarians serving them.

Think about it, and then share – with me, with coworkers, with mentors – with anyone who will listen. These conversations could potentially lead to a healthy revolution within our profession, and that’s an exciting possibility.

Side note: you can click on this post’s lone image to get a super-big high-res version of it to use however you’d like! Enjoy!

Library Date Due Slip Palooza!!!

I am excited to share with y’all my latest creations for sale at my Etsy shop: dozens of high-res library date due slips! And they’re only $2 per collection!! And I have 7 collections for you to choose from!!!

SHUT UP AND TAKE ME THERE NOW.

For those of  you who didn’t immediately click on the above link to check it out, here’s the whys and hows of this project.

Basically, I’ve been hoarding every date due slip I could get my hands on from my library – whether it be from weeding old books, or finding them in donated books – even my team members knew to keep a look out and put any of those slips on my desk.

Then, one day as I was scanning some in as a collage in order to craft with the printouts, I was like, “Huh. Others might like having access to these, too…”

That was about a year ago. Since then I have been slowly working on this project. It takes a while because I have to sort through the slips and find ones in decent condition/worth scanning, then scan them, and then do some photoshopping on them so that they’d be big, beautiful .pngs. I tried to keep the photoshopping to a minimum, but I still had to do a lot of work on them.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about, from the Gaylord collection:

So after I had a large number completed, I realized that I needed a way to sort them out since Etsy only allows a certain amount of file space per upload, and only five uploads per posting. I decided on splitting them up by publisher (or lack thereof). Then with the very substantial number of Library Store slips, I broke those up by number of columns, and then a set A and B for the 2-columned ones.

I had briefly toyed with the thought of listing all the dates included in the set. Briefly. It took one large slip to confirm that it would be an enormous task.

To sort of balance the scales, for each listing I made a collage of all the slips that were included within that listing. I hope that this helps anyone looking for a specific date, or a specific style of a date due slip.

Here’s an example from the Odd Variety collection:

Besides crafting with these, I have used them at work in a fun way. In our Main Library’s back office (which is visible to anyone at the circulation desk), there are a ridiculous number of thumbtack holes and other damages to the back wall. I printed out large versions of some of these, cut them out and placed them over the damage. It looks all purposeful and artsy-like.

I hope that you have fun finding ways to use these great files. I love that they’re a reminder of earlier library days, and especially that they’re physical proof that a) libraries have been here for decades, and b) we’ll continue to adjust and remain relevant.

Library Date Due Slips on Etsy

Nebraska: The Library State

Nebraska: The Library State about Rebecca McCorkindale's 2019 NLA Presidential candidacy, dreams, etc | hafuboti.com

Hello to all of the Nebraska library workers who may have decided to check out what Hafuboti is, who I am, or both! I hope that you have a fun time looking around my blog and using anything and everything that I share. And I do mean that I share everything under a Creative Commons license.

For my regular readers I should explain why I am hoping that a lot of Nebraskans are checking out my blog: I am running to be the Nebraska Library Association‘s President in 2019!!! YES I AM EXCITED TOO!!!

I thought everyone might be interested in learning more about my professional goal of making Nebraska The Library State. After all, it’s one of the main reasons that I decided to throw my hat into the ring. This goal came to me one day when I realized that there isn’t a U.S. state known as “The Library State,” and so why can’t my state earn that nickname?

This goal would be a really great way of unifying every single person who works in/for, volunteers at, or oversees any type of library. If we all kept this in the back of our minds while we work, we should be able to elevate our libraries and especially our library service to whole new levels. After all, every library is unique, staffed by vastly diverse workers, and is in a unique community. This sort of goal gives a leeway for it to be achieved in endless ways.

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have tourists coming from all over the world to check out our state’s libraries? Or people moving to our state because our school libraries are exceptional? People choosing to apply to our colleges because of the excellent college libraries?! Lawyers from all over jealous of our law libraries?!?!

See what I’m getting at?

It’s pretty awesome once you start thinking about it.

Have my thoughts triggered some ideas of your own? I’d love to hear about them! Feel free to comment below, or send me an email at hafuobti@gmail.com. 

Summer Hype Video 2017

I had the honor of making another video for the Washington County Cooperative Library System youth service team this summer.

A tiny bit of background on this project: the awesome Bryce from Bryce Don’t Play puts out an annual call to all library workers for fun/inspiring videos to help brighten the day of librarians who are pushed to the max during the summer months. Be sure to check out her compilation of the 2017 videos over on her blog. Watch and then think about doing one next year. Then do it.

Okay, on to my video – enjoy!

Library Logo Line Art

You could also call this post the fourth unofficial Build a Better Artwork post since I could totally see these being put out for a passive coloring program OR a SUPER SPECIAL FILL-IN-THE-LOGO WITH HOW TO BUILD A BETTER WORLD OR SOME SUCH COMMUNITY ART PROJECT WHERE YOU THEN CUT OUT THE IMAGE AND PUT THEM IN WINDOWS OR AROUND TOWN BECAUSE THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!!!!!!

Ahem.

Without further ado:

The perfect library coloring sheet!

Big and beautiful public library logo line art perfect as clipart or clip art OR a coloring sheet | hafuboti.com

TA-DA!!!

I’d absolutely love to see any and all of the creative things you do with this! Send me an email (hafuboti@gmail.com) and you’ll get a pretty quick response of me freaking out in the best way possible and/or me crying with overwhelming happiness. Try me.

UPDATE:

The fabulous Heidi L. can now attest to the fact that I will quickly freak out about her creative idea. I loved it so much that I asked permission to share it here, and she said yes!

Here’s how I’d like to use your line art graphic…. I’d like to distribute it to the local elementary school and have an art contest- give them the theme “Build a Better World” and a copy of the graphic. The winner gets their graphic put on our library’s summer reading brochure.