Nebraska: The Library State

Nebraska: The Library State about Rebecca McCorkindale's 2019 NLA Presidential candidacy, dreams, etc | hafuboti.com

Hello to all of the Nebraska library workers who may have decided to check out what Hafuboti is, who I am, or both! I hope that you have a fun time looking around my blog and using anything and everything that I share. And I do mean that I share everything under a Creative Commons license.

For my regular readers I should explain why I am hoping that a lot of Nebraskans are checking out my blog: I am running to be the Nebraska Library Association‘s President in 2019!!! YES I AM EXCITED TOO!!!

I thought everyone might be interested in learning more about my professional goal of making Nebraska The Library State. After all, it’s one of the main reasons that I decided to throw my hat into the ring. This goal came to me one day when I realized that there isn’t a U.S. state known as “The Library State,” and so why can’t my state earn that nickname?

This goal would be a really great way of unifying every single person who works in/for, volunteers at, or oversees any type of library. If we all kept this in the back of our minds while we work, we should be able to elevate our libraries and especially our library service to whole new levels. After all, every library is unique, staffed by vastly diverse workers, and is in a unique community. This sort of goal gives a leeway for it to be achieved in endless ways.

Wouldn’t it be amazing to have tourists coming from all over the world to check out our state’s libraries? Or people moving to our state because our school libraries are exceptional? People choosing to apply to our colleges because of the excellent college libraries?! Lawyers from all over jealous of our law libraries?!?!

See what I’m getting at?

It’s pretty awesome once you start thinking about it.

Have my thoughts triggered some ideas of your own? I’d love to hear about them! Feel free to comment below, or send me an email at hafuobti@gmail.com. 

Summer Hype Video 2017

I had the honor of making another video for the Washington County Cooperative Library System youth service team this summer.

A tiny bit of background on this project: the awesome Bryce from Bryce Don’t Play puts out an annual call to all library workers for fun/inspiring videos to help brighten the day of librarians who are pushed to the max during the summer months. Be sure to check out her compilation of the 2017 videos over on her blog. Watch and then think about doing one next year. Then do it.

Okay, on to my video – enjoy!

Library Logo Line Art

You could also call this post the fourth unofficial Build a Better Artwork post since I could totally see these being put out for a passive coloring program OR a SUPER SPECIAL FILL-IN-THE-LOGO WITH HOW TO BUILD A BETTER WORLD OR SOME SUCH COMMUNITY ART PROJECT WHERE YOU THEN CUT OUT THE IMAGE AND PUT THEM IN WINDOWS OR AROUND TOWN BECAUSE THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!!!!!!

Ahem.

Without further ado:

The perfect library coloring sheet!

Big and beautiful public library logo line art perfect as clipart or clip art OR a coloring sheet | hafuboti.com

TA-DA!!!

I’d absolutely love to see any and all of the creative things you do with this! Send me an email (hafuboti@gmail.com) and you’ll get a pretty quick response of me freaking out in the best way possible and/or me crying with overwhelming happiness. Try me.

UPDATE:

The fabulous Heidi L. can now attest to the fact that I will quickly freak out about her creative idea. I loved it so much that I asked permission to share it here, and she said yes!

Here’s how I’d like to use your line art graphic…. I’d like to distribute it to the local elementary school and have an art contest- give them the theme “Build a Better World” and a copy of the graphic. The winner gets their graphic put on our library’s summer reading brochure.

Socially Shiny

Combining Storytime Underground's Storytime for Social Justice logo, and my purple shiny muppet crystal | hafuboti.com

Since accepting Storytime Underground’Resolve to Rock several years ago (but in my own sparkly way), I have come to look forward to January’s reflection and goal setting. I’ve never been a fan of New Year’s resolutions, but having a librarycentric/professional focus has helped me really appreciate their power.

This year the SU Joint Chiefs have a different challenge: Storytime for Social Justice. Basically, we need to focus on and bring awesome aspects of social justice into our libraries and programming in only ways that YS-peeps can. Even if you don’t have a blog (which you totally should) you can still join in on this.

There Went 2016

While 2016 was a very difficult year overall, my professional life went through a metamorphosis. I discovered a lot about myself, how I view myself, and what I want to do in the library world – and for the world at large.

My biggest fail was not following through on my plan to write a nice note to each Nebraska youth service librarian that I could find. It was like turning this hope into a resolution totally took the wind out of my sails. But, over time I realized that I still want to do it, but as a Punk Rock Book Jockey, and not as the Chair of the School, Children, and Young People’s section of the Nebraska Library Association.

My biggest successes really boil down to figuring out what I truly meant by being shiny in the library world:

  • I spoke on behalf of my library in front of the Nebraska Senate General Affairs Committee (you can read it on page 75 of the transcript ). I sort of stumbled into doing it, and now that I’ve done it, I wouldn’t hesitate to do it again.
  • I gave my first presentations. It was rough going for awhile, but ultimately had a happy ending. This, in turn, led to me co-presenting at the Nevada Library Association’s annual conference (which was friggin’ AWESOME).
  • The idea for Punk Rock Book Jockeys was formed.
  • I became a published artist! I submitted this artwork based on Banksy’s The Flower Bomber to Resist!, and it was accepted:

A modified version of Banksy's Flower Bomber featuring a female librarian throwing Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale | hafuboti.com

I must give another heartfelt thank you to Jessamyn for both telling me about the call for entries and encouraging me to submit.

Here Comes 2017

Here’s a small sampling of my hopes and goals which, shockingly – I know, tie in with social justice:

  • Finish writing my Accessibility Series post for Bryce Don’t Play. This has been a tough piece for me to write on many levels, and so I tend to distract myself with other things and procrastinate ::has a moment of self-realization while typing this post:: Heh.
  • Continue working on Punk Rock Book Jockeys.
  • I have a massive artsy-early-literacy-skills-diversity thing I’m hoping to get going. OooOOOoOoooo…mysterious vagueness…
  • I’m gonna continue adding more diversity to our library’s collection. Tied in with this is that I want to make sure that more diverse titles get featured in our displays.
  • Become fluent in conversational Spanish. As a fibromyalgia manager, it can be a struggle to do physical things to help during this uncertain and downright terrifying time in our country. While watching the January 21st protests I thought “at least I can still raise my voice,” and that’s when this goal occurred to me. If I succeed, then I want to try to also gain fluency in Arabic. This world could use more understanding in a multitude of ways.
  • Learn more children’s names who visit the library. I’ve been working on this for a few months already, and the reaction from both the kids and parents has really inspired me to work harder on this. If I draw a blank, I do what Reading with Red‘s Brooke does and say “friend.” Like, “Hi, friend!” Even that can get a beaming smile.

And there you have it: my super-shiny mostly social justicey goals for 2017! If reading my goals somehow sparked your own, then I’d love to know. Please feel free to comment on this post or email them to me. I hope to touch base with you around this time next year to see how you did.

¡Listo o no aquí voy!

 

Holiday Challenge Accepted

Ah, what a magical time of year! ‘Tis the season to both make warm and fuzzy memories for the majority of the population all while alienating and/or denigrating the minorities.  Where staff hang garlands and deck their halls although they feel incredibly uncomfortable with this practice – all while feeling required to participate in the celebrations or be considered a Grinch or Scrooge who is waging a personal war against Christmas. Oh man, that Elf on the Shelf at the library is so gonna tattle on that person! Don’t forget to put out the token menorah!

But let’s take a step back and look at a group of Christmas celebrators who may feel alienated by your library’s Christmas decor: those in mourning. Over the past three years my husband and I have had three major loved ones die – two in this year alone. And let me tell you what: neither one of us feels like slapping on a fake smile in order to make others feel good about this time of year. We are surrounded by constant reminders that we will never again have a Christmas together with those we’ve lost. It sucks to say the very least.

Over the course of the years that I’ve been writing this blog, I have had a major shift in how I view holidays at the library. Because our community overwhelmingly celebrates Christmas, I thought that I was doing what was best by making our space join in on the festivities. Now I feel incredibly uncomfortable with this. Last year I chose to keep up my previous holiday blog posts. This year I removed them. Why? Because of horrible anti-Semitic, racist, xenophobic, Islamophobic comments written on posts of Storytime Underground‘s Facebook group. On Christmas-related posts. This is a youth services librarian group. These things were being said by youth service librarians. Merry Christmas?

So, this year I have decided to not participate in feeding the Christmas beast. I mean, if you can’t put together a Christmas-tastic program or come up with ways to decorate your library on your own? Um. Maybe make time for learning how to use Pinterest and/or google “library christmas decor.” You will find an overabundance of help and ideas – just no longer on this blog.

Instead, I’ve decided to put together several posts highlighting winter holidays that somehow get constantly ignored. These are ones that, for whatever reason, all-inclusive children-level holiday-program celebrating librarians tend to leave out (although they automatically leave out Atheists or others who just don’t do holidays – this is why I’m specifically focusing on Children’s programming/decor because if you’re gonna be all-inclusive, there must be a discussion about how Santa isn’t real, and that’s more of an Adult thing that I could write another entire blog post on). These are holidays that could cause controversy because they’re not warm ‘n fuzzy, or not celebrated by as many people in the US.

In the comments section of another site’s pandering post about holiday celebrations in the library (I’m choosing not to link to it), a librarian joked that finding a picture book on Satanic holidays wasn’t going to happen.

My immediate thought?

So, I’m putting other posts on hold for now until 2017 (including this year’s awesome non-holiday Decemberley theme that has warm fuzzies out the wazoo). Until then I will be putting together alternative holiday programs for youth service librarians. The posts will have sign templates, imagery that can be used in displays, passive program ideas, etc.

All of this said, I am in no way an expert in any of these celebrations, so if you celebrate any of them that I cover, then I’d truly appreciate your thoughts and reactions to what I’ve created. I want to get it right. Though, I truly do believe that libraries should not do holidays. If you want to help the sad children who won’t have a Christmas without the library’s intervention? Then please help those children by volunteering your time and talents to local organizations – that would be awesome and way more appropriate.

Finally, I have two thank yous to share:

I’d like to thank the youth service librarian who gave me the idea for this series. She very seriously wrote to me that she would absolutely love to see a Krampusnacht display at her public library since it’s one of her favorite holidays and Christmas is super-de-dooper represented with their decor. You know who you are – and you’re gonna be thrilled with the kick-off post for this series. 

And to the librarian who joked about Satanic picture books: I appreciate the shove that you gave me to make a difference in this world. I think it’s gonna be great.

Here’s links to the various celebrations as they are posted: