Book End Cozy Redux

This is the third, and final, sign revamp post. Here is part one and part two in case you missed them.

As I went to look for my post on what I call “book end cozies,” I realized that my first post about them was buried in a holiday-book post. Oops.

And at the beginning of my most recent book end cozy quest (heh), I thought that I had come up with an amazing new way to use laminating machines, which prompted me to post this:

Well, it turned out to not work. Even the first prototype turned out to be a fail after I looked at it closer. But hey! Hopefully, through my research, I can save you from experiencing upsetting things like laminator-jams:

Needless to say, I finally came up with a fool-proof template for professional-looking bookend cozies that I am excited to share with you! Yay!

Okay, so exactly are book end cozies? Well, they’re signs that go over bookends to indicate exactly what books are contained between those book ends. Like this:

SMALL BOOK END COZIES
(5.5″W X 4.75″W)

First up, I measured out and designed what I wanted our cozies to look like, and then printed them out onto cardstock to give them a better chance at a long life. Note that both sizes of cozies are on Letter-sized paper (8.5″ X 11″).

Then, I used our slide-cutter to cut the signs out. If you don’t know what slide-cutter is (also known as a paper trimmer), then you need to get yourself one. I have been using a Fiskars paper trimmer for both work and my ornaments, and it’s fan-friggin-tastic. Here’s what it looks like:

It has a thin wire that goes along where the blade will cut – so you can see exactly where your cut will be made. It doesn’t handle stacks of papers, but it’s totally fine with two pieces of stacked cardstock. This slicer is perfect for detailed work.

Once I had two of these signs cut out, I folded each in half and then made a sharp crease using a bone-folder (they’re not just for book covering). You can make folded things, such as brochures, look so professional by using a bone folder.

I took it a step further (let’s hear it for type-A’s!!!) and added some black crayon scribble on the sign, and along the white edges of the cut cardstock:

This was to give it a bit more depth, as well as hide any miss-folds and/or the white edges.

Now it’s laminatin’ time.

Two smaller cozies can go in one laminator sheet, you just have to be a bit careful.

Once they’re out – it’s trimmin’ time!

I sliced the laminate edges down to 3/16″ around the sides and top, :

And then on the bottom, I sliced a tiny bit off of the paper:

I did this so that they’d become a pocket, like so:

Okay, that may not have been the best visual example, but at this point, the cozy is done. All you have to do is slip is over a small book end:

Doesn’t it just pop compared to the cozy that it’s replacing? And it totally matches our new signs. Plus, the original was looking rough, but note that it was never laminated. Here’s a shot from the back:

It even looks good on this side! And there’s an added bonus that we shouldn’t need to use packing tape to keep it on. If, after it gets regular use and it turns out that tape is needed, then I’ll update this post.

LARGE BOOK END COZIES
(9″H X 6″W)

The large cozies end up needing two pieces of Letter-sized paper, but one laminate sheet.

So here we start out:

I had to re-shoot the above image, so yes, it’s a different sign, but same size as what’s below. And I had a “blank” black scribbles page printed out, too. I did some added scribbling and white-edge covering here as well:

Not pictured: sandwiching the two sheets back-to-back and then laminating them in one laminated sheet, and then cutting down the extra laminate (down to a 3/16″ edge) , and trimming off the bottom.

In the following picture you can see the new cozies and one of the cozies that they’re replacing. The original is completely sun-faded (it used to be black and a light orange). I’m hoping that using a printed-out design will lessen or altogether eliminate the fading.

And best part? You can use these cozies with different styles of book ends to bring about a cohesive look. These are what the above book ends look like without their cozies:

And here’s what a book end cozy looks like in use:

Whispers “Sooo Preeeeettyyyyyy…”

Now for some technical stuff that should get you book end cozying to the max!

If you have Photoshop, then email me (hafuboti@gmail.com) and I will send you the layered files for the small and large cozies.

Don’t have Photoshop, but have Word? Have Photoshop, but don’t wanna email me for files? Then here are the measurements for cozy text boxes:

Small Cozy: 4.92″ H x 5.25″ W

Large Cozy: 9.5″ H x 6.62″ W

Have Word and don’t know what I’m talking about? You can tell Word the exact size that you’d like to have your text box. With your text box selected, go into the Format/Drawing Tools tab and look to the right:

Ta-da!

And hey, if you need more help with this, then just reach out to me. I will breakdown any aspect of this process if you’re uncertain about any part of it.

Signs of the Times

This is the second part of my series of signage in the library. I only feel slightly sorry if you just punched your monitor because I used the word “signage.” The English language, despite decades of trying to pin it down, remains awesomely fluid.

Anywho.

(heh)

In the first part of this series I discussed auditing your library’s signs. That post was very much geared towards directional/indicator signs. This one is focusing on early literacy signs that compliment the other signs. They also hide how messy my crayon-covered signs look on their backsides.

The most important thing I need to mention is that the vast majority of these signs were completely borrowed and modified from Julie Crabb‘s Tales For the Tinythis post, specifically. So if you don’t like my versions, then you have the original ones as a fantastic option.

Some reasons that I chose to modify Julie’s signs were so that they’d fit our sign holders (portrait 8.5″ x 11″), be crisper/more modern, and use our branded font on the vast majority of them. Impact!

I would also have loved to get more diverse children represented in our signs, but I was limited by our stock photo site. Harumph. Hey – if you happen to have an isolated image of a child or children that you think would be perfect for any of these signs, then send it my way and I can add it to this collection in order to give it more variety.

I shall now stop typing and switch to giving! Fell free to click on and download any or all of the following images for your own use. For reals. Enjoy!

 

 

The only sign that I opted to use a different font on was this last one. I struggled to figure out what image I wanted to go with it. I finally narrowed it down to wanting it to be a child holding a crayon (continuing that theme), but the closest that I could get was this girl with the colored pencils. So I went with it. I matched the font’s colors to the colored pencils in the photo to give it more cohesion. At least it ties in overall with the “crayon scribble” theme that I have going on. This font is called Pastel Crayon.

At this point I am unsure whether or not there will be a part 3. I’m thinking that there will be, it just depends on whether or not my idea works in reality. Well, even if it sort of works, I’ll be sure to share. And I’ll update this post with a link to it.

Until then, happy signing!

ETA: Okay, so I didn’t proof this post or my signs close enough. Thank you to the two awesome readers who caught both errors: one in the first image, and the other in the next-to-last. They have both been corrected.

Get Your Sticker On!

 

I know, I know – you’re here for the free stuffs, and lately it’s been mostly costing stuffs. Unfortunately, that’s how things are for me currently, and how things are for a lot of library employees in smaller cities. So yes, I would love to get back to posting free resources, and that truly is a hope of mine, and I’ll totally have a dance party when that day comes – I just don’t know when that’ll be.

Okay. That’s covered.

Now onto something that will only cost you about $1: a downloadable sticker template for library scavenger hunts! More specifically, it’s a good generic printable that you could use for any library scavenger hunt! Yay!

Here’s the sample sheet:

These work with AVERY brand round labels 5293. Like this:

Once we print out a sheet, we then cut out each sticker. Depending on how busy we are, we’ll either put out a few for a child to choose from, or give them a sticker to help things keep moving. Here’s our little sticker bowl:

And that’s really it! Simple ‘n good. You can purchase this instant download from my Etsy shop.

As always, don’t hesitate to ask me any questions – either in the comments, or on my Facebook page, or through email at Hafuboti@gmail.com.

Library Date Due Slip Palooza!!!

I am excited to share with y’all my latest creations for sale at my Etsy shop: dozens of high-res library date due slips! And they’re only $2 per collection!! And I have 7 collections for you to choose from!!!

SHUT UP AND TAKE ME THERE NOW.

For those of  you who didn’t immediately click on the above link to check it out, here’s the whys and hows of this project.

Basically, I’ve been hoarding every date due slip I could get my hands on from my library – whether it be from weeding old books, or finding them in donated books – even my team members knew to keep a look out and put any of those slips on my desk.

Then, one day as I was scanning some in as a collage in order to craft with the printouts, I was like, “Huh. Others might like having access to these, too…”

That was about a year ago. Since then I have been slowly working on this project. It takes a while because I have to sort through the slips and find ones in decent condition/worth scanning, then scan them, and then do some photoshopping on them so that they’d be big, beautiful .pngs. I tried to keep the photoshopping to a minimum, but I still had to do a lot of work on them.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about, from the Gaylord collection:

So after I had a large number completed, I realized that I needed a way to sort them out since Etsy only allows a certain amount of file space per upload, and only five uploads per posting. I decided on splitting them up by publisher (or lack thereof). Then with the very substantial number of Library Store slips, I broke those up by number of columns, and then a set A and B for the 2-columned ones.

I had briefly toyed with the thought of listing all the dates included in the set. Briefly. It took one large slip to confirm that it would be an enormous task.

To sort of balance the scales, for each listing I made a collage of all the slips that were included within that listing. I hope that this helps anyone looking for a specific date, or a specific style of a date due slip.

Here’s an example from the Odd Variety collection:

Besides crafting with these, I have used them at work in a fun way. In our Main Library’s back office (which is visible to anyone at the circulation desk), there are a ridiculous number of thumbtack holes and other damages to the back wall. I printed out large versions of some of these, cut them out and placed them over the damage. It looks all purposeful and artsy-like.

I hope that you have fun finding ways to use these great files. I love that they’re a reminder of earlier library days, and especially that they’re physical proof that a) libraries have been here for decades, and b) we’ll continue to adjust and remain relevant.

Library Date Due Slips on Etsy

Sexuality & Gender Identity Pride Library Logos

A month ago or so, a dear friend (Hi, Nick!) reached out to me to suggest making pride versions of the public library logo. And two days ago, when I was included in a Twitter thread about a design that I had not created, I decided to drop everything and get to work.

I was ultra-inspired and created over 150 designs based on pride flag designs. Fear not! I will not upload them all to my blog (and thus having my followers receive a ginormous email from me as a result). Instead, I have uploaded them to the Wikimedia Commons.

A huge shout-out must go to PrideNation.LGBT for their collection of flag designs. I would not have created these images as efficiently as I did without their shop. Follow the above link and check out their great items for sale (they have way more than just flags).

I would like to dedicate this work to the gay young man who had genuine questions for me back during my college years. It was that single open and thoughtful discussion that has had a beautiful rippling effect throughout my life. I may not remember your name, but you will never be forgotten.

Here are a few sample images for you to use or modify in any way that you’d like. And like everything on my blog, it’s under a Creative Commons license, with the bonus that I do not want to be credited on the artwork. Truly. Look through all of the designs here, and please don’t hesitate to let me know if I unintentionally did anything insensitive, or left anyone out. I’ll get it fixed ASAP!

Bisexual Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Lesbian Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Pride Support Fist Rainbow Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Librafluid Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Polyamory Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com

I have also uploaded some of the hearts and other symbols that I used such as the following Abrosexual Pride Heart:

Abrosexual Pride Heart | Hafuboti.com

ETA:
I had a request for a Facebook cover photo featuring Pride hearts and the #LAFE message. Here it is:

Here’s one for your Twitter account: