Sexuality & Gender Identity Pride Library Logos

Sexuality and Gender Identity Pride Library Logos with link to Wikimedia Commons | Hafuboti.com

A month ago or so, a dear friend (Hi, Nick!) reached out to me to suggest making pride versions of the public library logo. And two days ago, when I was included in a Twitter thread about a design that I had not created, I decided to drop everything and get to work.

I was ultra-inspired and created over 150 designs based on pride flag designs. Fear not! I will not upload them all to my blog (and thus having my followers receive a ginormous email from me as a result). Instead, I have uploaded them to the Wikimedia Commons.

A huge shout-out must go to PrideNation.LGBT for their collection of flag designs. I would not have created these images as efficiently as I did without their shop. Follow the above link and check out their great items for sale (they have way more than just flags).

I would like to dedicate this work to the gay young man who had genuine questions for me back during my college years. It was that single open and thoughtful discussion that has had a beautiful rippling effect throughout my life. I may not remember your name, but you will never be forgotten.

Here are a few sample images for you to use or modify in any way that you’d like. And like everything on my blog, it’s under a Creative Commons license, with the bonus that I do not want to be credited on the artwork. Truly. Look through all of the designs here, and please don’t hesitate to let me know if I unintentionally did anything insensitive, or left anyone out. I’ll get it fixed ASAP!

Bisexual Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Lesbian Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Pride Support Fist Rainbow Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Librafluid Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com Polyamory Pride Library Logo | Hafuboti.com

I have also uploaded some of the hearts and other symbols that I used such as the following Abrosexual Pride Heart:

Abrosexual Pride Heart | Hafuboti.com

Librarians Can Do It!

Last year I had the honor of being the keynote speaker for the Lake Superior Libraries Symposium – it’s a great conference that if you get a chance to attend, then please do! Not only did I keynote, but they asked if I would design a logo for their theme of Advance, Challenge, Transform. After a failed initial design, the conference committee suggested that I go back to what I do best. And I did!
And here’s the result:

Librarians Can Do It universal library logo design that riffs on the famous WWII poster | Hafuboti.com

I shared this image on my social media accounts, and there were requests for merchandise, so I went ahead and added this design to my Society6 shop.

Three examples of the Librarians Can Do It merchandise in Hafuboti's Society6 shop | Hafuboti.com

And as with anything that I post on my blog, it’s under a Creative Commons license. Beyond that, I also ask as an artist that you do not credit me on my minimalist designs (like this one). I feel that it takes away from the impact of the image, and that’s the most important thing to me.

Now go do all the things!!!

Mouse on a Gruffalo

As I was checking in our library’s copy of Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s The Gruffalo, I had a sudden inspiration. Then I had to wait until my lunch break to turn the inspiration into a reality. And did I ever make it real!

BEHOLD:

A silly inspiration guaranteed to get the "Guy on a Buffalo" song stuck in your head: it's Mouse on a Gruffalo!!! | Hafuboti.com

If you don’t get the reference, then check out this awesome music video.
Fair Warning: you will get that song stuck in your head.

And you’re welcome to everyone who now has that song stuck in their head. Heh.

Libraries Are For Everyone

One of the bestest-best things that has happened as a result of having this blog is that I get to connect with librarians from all over the world. It’s just flat-out awesome. And sometimes those connections lead to a collaboration like what just recently happened with Julie Syler and Ashley Jones from the Saline County Library in Benton, Arkansas. They were preparing for National Library Legislative Day, and wanted to use my images. One thing led to another and we ended up making some pretty sharp-looking images for the occasion. (coughHUMBLEBRAGcoughcough)

Because we all love to share, we decided to post our creations here for anyone/everyone to use!

Without further ado – click on, download, and use any or all of the following images:

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a rose background | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with an orange background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a green background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a blue background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a purple background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background with 10 diverse representations of library patrons - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Get an updated version of the above sign (with global variety) by following this link.

There you have it: something that I would not have done if someone hadn’t reached out to me!  (hint-hint eyebrow wiggle)

I’d love to know if you or your library end up using any or all of these signs either in the comments here, or by emailing me at hafuboti@gmail.com. Otherwise, I just plan on making high-pitched EEP! noises if/when I come across one of these in the wild (like as a profile pic or some such thing).

OTHER LANGUAGES AVAILABLE:
Afaan Oromo
Afrikaans
Albanian
American Sign Language
Amharic
Arabic
Armenian
Basque
Belarusian
Bengali
Braille
Bulgarian
Chickasaw
Chinese
Cree
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Diné Bizaad
Dutch
Esperanto
Farsi
Filipino
Finnish
French
Georgian
German
Greek
Hatian Creole
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Hopi
Hungarian
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish Gaeilge
Italian
Japanese
Kannada
Karen
Khmer
Kiksht/Wasq’u
Kinyarwanda
Klingon
Korean
Kurdish
Latin
Lithuanian
Malay
Malayalam
Mandarin
Marathi
Marshallese
Nepalese
Norwegian
Obijwe
Odia/Oriya
Pashto
Polish
Portuguese
Romanian
Russian
Sepedi
Serbian
Sinhalese
SiSwati
Somali
Southern Sotho
Spanish
Sugs’tun
Swahili
Swedish
Tagalog
Tamazight
Tamil
Telugu
Thai
Turkish
Turkmen
Urdu
Uzbek
Welsh
Wolof
Xhosa
Zulu

 

THE FREE FONT THAT I USED

A NOTE: I am slowly working on getting my artwork uploaded onto the Wikimedia Commons for people to find it easier all the while making all of it “officially” licensed. That said – my entire blog here is under a Creative Commons Attribute/Share Alike license – so know that I both want and encourage everyone to download, share, modify, and have fun with my work!

I also want to reiterate what I’ve stated in the past since I can’t make it an exception within the license: I do not want my name (given or business) on my minimalist art. It sort of ruins the clean lines and elegance. Just don’t tell people that you’re the creator – I’m fine with you crediting it to “an awesome Punk Rock Book Jockey blogger” if you can’t recall either of my names. Or write by Hafuboti on the back in pencil if you’re worried about it. Seriously. Have fun.

I plan on putting this note on the bottom of all of my Libraries Are For Everyone posts so if you’ve read the above paragraph once, then you won’t need to again (unless you really want to).

Build a Better Artwork pt. 3

Grouping of four diverse modified public library symbols | hafuboti.com

I recently realized that I could easily modify my alternative summer programming artwork (here and here) to give a wider variety and make them overall more useful in library land. The way I’d do that would be to take each image and replace what the character was holding with a globe.

I must give a HUGE shout-out to both Angie and  Bryce for brainstorming ideas to represent PWD. These images would not be as diverse if I had not had their help.

There is a subtle difference in these images from their original counterparts: I moved the figures so that all would line up along the bottom line of their arms. The thought was that if you line them up, then they’d have a nice flow and their diverseness would be even more obvious.

Feel free to click on and download any or all of these and use them throughout your library, as profile pictures, buttons, etc.

Modified public library logo featuring a yellow background and an elderly person holds the world instead of a book | hafuboti.com

Modified public library logo featuring a burnt orange background featuring a First Nation man holding the Earth | hafuboti.com

Alternate library logo featuring an African-American girl holding a globe on a purple background | hafuboti.com

A different take on the universal public library logo featuring a person holding the planet on a golden background | hafuboti.com

An awesome African-American woman holds the world on this alternative public library logo | hafuboti.com

An edgy person with a cochlear implant holds the world in a special version of the universal public library image | hafuboti.com

A person in a reclining wheelchair looks at an assistive device that displays the planet Earth | hafuboti.com

Homage to the public library logo featuring a woman wearing a hijab while gazing at the planet | hafuboti.com

Library logo featuring an African-American male with a hearing aid and an epic fade holding the planet vs. a book | hafuboti.com

A female with a tracheotomy holds the world in this modified universal public library symbol | hafuboti.com

As always, if you feel that I have misrepresented or made any unintentional errors in any of my artwork, then please let me know.

Also please consider sending me a thank you donation for sharing this artwork. These look simple, but as anyone who does minimalist work knows, it’s deceptively difficult. For example: the female engineer took about 16 hours to complete. Seriously. So thank you for your thank you if you choose to thank me!