Sign After Sign

Sign After Sign: sharing three behavioral expectation signs that we have at our Children's Library: age, cell phones, and clothing | Hafuboti.com

Oh hai!

To say the very least: my life has ramped up intensity almost to my breaking point. But I miss blogging! But blogging takes time and energy – two things that I have very little of right now! It’s a Catch-Shmoopitty-Shmoo!

But I’ve had a handful of library workers, from Nebraska and beyond, reach out to me about our policies and signs. And when I hear a question regularly or notice a consistent issue, then I know that whatever it is is something that should be addressed one way or another. So after I shared our info with them, I thought that I should share this with you!

I’ve written about my seeing the signs previously, and have continued to try and be aware of when a sign may be of help (and not passive-aggressive). We’ve had a pair of signs at our Children’s Library for years now that I never thought to share here. They’re on both of our exterior doors:

Our library's age policy in terms of how old you must be before you're allowed to be in the library alone | Hafuboti.com

Our Children's Library's "no cell phone calls" sign that is posted at both entrances/exits | Hafuboti.com

It really does help to have these signs posted in order to point them out to either children or their caregivers (though we still get shocked/offended parents who are embarrassed that they got called out on policy violations).

This summer is the first time in about two years where we’ve added to these expectations signs:

A simple yet punny sign stating our library's policy on what's expected in terms of patrons being fully clothed to be in our library | Hafuboti.com

I must say that I had a blast looking at baby goat images – especially the ones in pajamas. I ended up cobbling together the image using doggie shoes, vest, and a toddler’s pair of pants.

I had several librarian friends share concerns that some snarky patrons would bring in actual baby goats in clothes, and I was like “OMG DO YOU THINK THEY WILL?! HECK YEAH!!!!!” I’ll be sure to update here if that ever happens (and I really want that to happen).

But back to the point!

I thought y’all might like to see how we post our signs so that you can see how small they are, and how they’re placed. The ones at the front entrance routinely get moved around depending on how we decorate the windows – which I think is a bonus since signs posted and left in the same position become a piece of the background for our regulars.

How we place some of our behavior expectations/policies at the Children's Library | Hafuboti.com

And yes – you’re getting a sneak peak of what we’ve done with our decor for the summer theme Libraries Rock!

Now ENHANCE IMAGE:

Enhanced closeup of the behavior expectations/policies near our front entrance at the Children's Library | Hafuboti.com

And our side entrance:

The side entrance of our Children's Library where we post the same behavior expectation signs as we have at our front entrance | Hafuboti.com

In case you don’t know what the Mister Rogers & Friends mini window display is: check it out.

Now ENHANCE THIS ONE TOO:

Closeup view of our behavior expectations signs on the side entrance of our Children's Library | Hafuboti.com

As always, feel free to use/modify any of the images/signs in this post! And also as always, feel free to reach out to me with any questions however you’re most comfortable (in comments, email, Facebook, etc).

January 2017: ‘appy New Year!

'APPY NEW YEAR!!! Having some emoji fun while highlighting our ebook collection. It's a fun way to kick off a new year! | Hafuboti.com

I thought of possibly trying to just sort of publish this post and say nothing about how it’s a year old!!!!! But yeah. You can tell that I decided against that. Instead, I’m highlighting this fact, shrugging my shoulders, and reframing it so that I can embrace it and be all “YEAAAAH!!! FINALLY GETTIN’ IT DONE!!!”

My life and career have become very intense as of late, and blogging has obviously gone on the back burner. So what I’m hoping to do is share what we did last year in one post followed by another post sharing what we’ve done this year. Trying to keep up with the months should give me a goal to reach for while getting this here blog caught up on all of our shenanigans. Theoretically.

Here goes nothing!

I had the idea for the ‘appy New Year theme during Holly Storck-Post’s (of Let the Wild Rumpus Start Storytime Underground fame) presentation about early literacy apps at the 2016 Nevada Library Association conference. She talked about her library’s Appy Hour program and I was like “I KNOW JANUARY’S THEME!” I even drew stars and hearts around this idea in the small notebook that I had for notetaking.

And a few months later – voila! It was our theme!

Our fabulously talented Natasia had a fun time putting together the front window display featuring emojis. This was long before the Emoji Movie existed and we were taken aback at how popular this theme was. I lost count of how many kids would come in and say something like “I LOVE EMOJIS!!!”

Get 'Appy! Celebrating great apps for kids and families during January's 'Appy New Year theme at the Children's Library | Hafuboti.com

The biggest app that we highlighted was our library’s account with Overdrive to help both parents and kids know that we had a wonderful resource for them. In fact, we made finding 2D ereaders our scavenger hunt.

An 'Appy New Year passive scavenger hunt program encouraging kids to practice their writing skills | Hafuboti.comThis particular scavenger hunt was a bit more challenging in that we wanted to have kids work on their writing skills. We don’t always make our passive programs this challenging for our youngest patrons, but we try and push them now and then. Needless to say, we chose books with shorter titles.

I wish that we had kept copies of the ebook scavenger hunt files to share with you, but unfortunately they are nowhere to be found. But, while searching for them, I discovered that we did keep our simple but very popular coloring sheet. Click on the image below to get a letter-sized version without my logo on it:

An incredibly simple and popular emoji coloring sheet | Hafuboti.comFinally, Natasia made a bright sign for our reading bench display. We showcased our books about computer science, technology, and video games. This proved to be a tough display to keep stocked! <<<a great problem to have!

An 'appy New Year book display featuring books on computer science, technology, and video games! | Hafuboti.com

I you look closely, you can see one of our eBook scavenger hunt pieces in the middle of our clock. It’s a Curious George eBook with a circled number on its lower right hand side.

And that’s how we kicked off 2017. I can hardly wait to show you what we did for 2018 – and hopefully I’ll be showing off much sooner than later!

Decemberley 2016

The Children's Library's annual Decemberley celebration where we celebrate picture book illustrators. This year we celebrated Jan Brett's The Mitten. It's a great alternative to holiday decor that can alienate our public | hafuboti.com

Yes, I got behind on sharing on my blog near the end of last year. But let’s just say that I felt that writing some other things in December mattered more than this particular warm-fuzziness. And our December was chock full of the warm fuzzies. Like, it has been one of the most reacted-to-by-adults theme that we’ve ever done.

But lemme back it up a sec.

When we were trying to figure out the second Decemberley celebration, we realized that Ed Embereley’s work could only go so far. So we knew that the next time we’d still call it Decemberley, but focus on other famous children’s book illustrators. And in 2016 we decided to pay homage to Jan Brett’s The Mitten.

With that choice we inadvertently tapped into some major nostalgia for many parents. I mean, we want adults to feel just as inspired when they enter our space as the children are, but this time? I think the parents enjoyed Natasia’s work more than their kiddos did. One dad, as he was walking in, excitedly said “I remember this book! I LOVED this book!” I also suspect that Brett received a bit of a bump in sales as a result of our decor. Tee-hee!

Without further ado, here’s our The Mitten homage:

A beautiful homage to Jan Brett's The Mitten at the entrance of our Children's Library | hafuboti.com

Looking at it again almost a year later, I still get the warm fuzzies.

The animal faces are actually masks that Jan Brett provides for free on her website – Natasia just printed them larger than a typical child’s head. She drew/colored everything else: Jaw. Drop.

I failed to get a nice picture of the cool giant pair of mittens that Natasia made for above the reading bench. There was one in each window, and the paper mittens were embellished with braided yarn. And then a large braided piece of yarn attached the two together. It was striking.

Despite my lack of photos, I hope that our annual December celebration inspires you to think outside of the holiday box. It truly frees you to tap into some unexpected ways to cheer others up during one of the coldest months of the year.

KNOWvember

Jennifer, our kick-booty Children’s Librarian, had a great request for some of our monthly themes: throw more non-fiction into the mix. And we have! And it’s been more fun than I thought it’d be! And yes! I am exclaiming a lot! But that’s mainly because of our first super-focused on non-fic theme: Celebrating "KNOWvember" in November can be a lot of factual fun! | hafuboti.com

As a child, I totally recall thinking about how both no and know sounded exactly alike. Hooray for homonyms! It was probably the first time I enjoyed linguistics and stuff like that there. So seeing this theme made my inner child pretty happy for the entire month.

Natasia did a beautiful job on decorating our front windows:

"Knowvember!" A theme for the Children's Library where the focus was on non-fiction and facts! | hafuboti.com

Each section of the window had its own theme: history, science, math, and the arts.

She also turned our whiteboard in the activity area into a jumble of facts:

A whiteboard with "Did You Know?!" at the top, and then a mix of facts printed out and taped up for kids and families to read and learn. | hafuboti.com

Natasia also made a cool non-fiction book display with the word KNOW spelled out as a sign. Sorry that I failed to take a photo of that. I also failed to get a photo of Ashlynn’s nerdy scavenger hunt. I really need to make a monthly list of photos that I need to take before we switch out themes. You’ll have to trust me that those things were pretty cool.

But I hope I was able to share enough to inspire you to create your own non-fiction and factual displays!

SeptZENber

It turns out that I got some of my themes/months confused. I had thought that our Pokemon Go decor had been in September. Nope. It was a bonus August theme (thank you to my team for pointing this out to me – and I’ve gone back and corrected my earlier posts as a result). Basically for September’s theme we wanted something relaxing and peaceful; thus SeptZENber was born.

Natasia made a stunning tissue paper mandala in our front windows:

The front windows and door at our Children's Library featuring a lovely tissue paper and Mod Podge mandala in celebration of SeptZENber | hafuboti.com

I would find myself gazing at it when I needed a mental break from the tasks at hand. It looked especially beautiful in the morning sunlight since our building faces east. We also received a larger-than-normal amount of compliments and questions on the application technique from our patrons.

Natasia further continued the loveliness with our reading bench display:

Beautiful "Relaxing Reads" library display with a simplified flowery mandala | hafuboti.com

HUGER THAN NORMAL thank you goes to Natasia for this picture. I absolutely failed at getting good pics of all of her hard work which I hope to have corrected for future posts. It’s worth noting that this display was quite popular with parents who were in the midst of back-to-school stresslandia.

If you look closely at the above pic, you’ll notice a smallish peace sign with something on it on one of the window frames – that was part of our monthly scavenger hunt. It was one where the kids had to find the different colored peace signs and put it on their worksheet. Then they had to unscramble the letters to spell out a simple word like peace or love – depending on the week (or their age – we didn’t make preschoolers do the word scramble).

We also had special classes with Two Keys Creative Studio on stone mandalas and stone painting. Thank you to the instructor Sarah Fettin-Kuester for providing this pretty cool picture from one of our classes:

Image of library class attendees showing off their painted stone mandalas. Photo courtesy of Two Keys Creative Studio | hafuboti.com

It was during this class that Sarah discussed cultural appropriation and what a fine line it can be while giving a lesson about mandalas and what they meant in Hinduism and Buddhism. As a result, I had an “OMG I NEVER THOUGHT OF THIS THAT WAY ” revelation. And because of this realization, I do not plan to repeat this exact theme, class, or use mandala coloring sheets for any of our passive coloring programs. I’d much rather err on the side of respect.

We also had a local yoga instructor come in and host classes for both young ones and their families. They were a big hit, and I only had to handle one complaint that “yoga is demonic and anyone who does it invites demons in to possess them.” True story. I believe that the patron and I had a good discussion about this since I try and do yoga to help with my chronic pain, and not once have I been possessed. In the end she was grateful that I took the time to listen and thoughtfully respond. Again – erring on the side of respect.

And that was really the biggest lesson I learned during SeptZenber:

Wouldn’t the world be a nicer place if we all erred on the side of respect?